Musings on business value, sale preparation, sale negotiations, sale structure.

Posts Tagged ‘Budget 2017’

Four budget speech hurdles

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Not a very official analysis of what will fall out of the 2016/17 budget speech. There is no investigative authority involved. I have not phoned any treasury officials, and I am not privy to an embargoed copy of the speech. #JustSaying. In many respects, this is an alternative to what the popular commentators having been writing for the last week. More importantly, it gives some idea of how the value of your business may be affected.

Small business owners tend to not care too much about the annual budget speech. Like John Lennon who famously said: “I never vote because the government always gets in”, they know that no matter what they think, the budget has been decided and they will be affected – good, bad, or ugly.

This year’s budget is different because of the ramifications of a cock-up following #4DaysInDecember. Investors are watching us, in an environment where the rest of the world is growing, albeit relatively slowly. South Africa has pretty much ground to a halt.

For small business people who are able to nimbly make allowances for changing economic, legislative and tax requirements, the speech means less about talking heads in the immediate aftermath, and more about where loopholes can be exploited, own policies tweaked, and changes taken advantage of.

I think that it is unlikely that the minister will provide us with any short term good news, and nor is it likely that he will mess around with little fiddly changes all over the place. He needs to be seen to be making sweeping changes to effective rates in easily result providing areas. Look out for these pointers

1. VAT

If the VAT rate goes up, you should know that we are really in trouble. Many commentators suggest that this is too hot a political potato to deal with now. It will affect the poor and the rich, and the EFF will scream blue murder. The Davis Tax Commission has reportedly suggested that this is the most efficient way to increase revenue. The poor can be accommodated with a marginal increase in social grants.

Might I suggest that the manner in which the Cabinet backed down on the Tax Amendment Act was the left hand of a deal with Cosatu, allowing the right hand to lift the VAT rate with minimal noise from the trade union congress.

Effect on your business value

Probably minimal. VAT collections are trust moneys, which you need to account for separately to your income statement and balance sheet. If your product has a close link to the retail user, you may come under some short term pressure, but life will go on. Expect some arbitrage around the date on which the VAT rate changes, from the unscrupulous.

2. Amnesties

We are a country of amnesties, and we all understand them very well, from giving amnesty to murderers under the old regime (also committed by members of the new regime), to the various tax amnesties, and the fact that so many small businesses give a monthly amnesty to their debtors by way of a settlement discount to encourage them to pay their bills.

South Africa needs to collect money in a hurry, and an amnesty for all sorts of tax misdemeanours is quite likely, if it means that outstanding taxes are collected quickly and easily.

Effect on your business value

If you have some of these skeletons hiding away, this may give you a opportunity to come clean before risking the process of a due diligence in a sale of your business in the next few years. The improved sleep patterns may also give you further energy to get up and go, for at least a while.

On the negative side, your customers may find themselves cash constrained as they come to terms with having to actually pay those taxes they have been dodging. That may mean fewer, or smaller sales for your business while the system adjusts. Those sales changes will translate into lower profits for a while.

3. Corporate tax

  • In 1980 corporate tax was 42%.
  • In 1982 it rose to 46.2%
  • In 1984 it rose to 50%
  • With the approach of some democracy, Treasury was able to lower it to 48% in 1991, then 40% in 1993. We thought it was Christmas!
  • It got confusing in 1994 with a once off RDP tax of 5%. Nobody seems entirely sure of where that went, but anyway…
  • By 1995 it had dropped to 35%.
  • 1999 it dropped further to 30%
  • 2005 saw 29%
  • And 2009 saw us drop to the current 28%.

Interest rates are rising, and corporate tax is likely to do the same.

According to the Davis Tax Commission, a 3% rise in VAT to 17% will have the same effect as a rise in corporate tax to 33.2%.

Effect on your business value

This is a tricky one, dependent on how you negotiate the sale of your business. You will need to consider other issues, such as whether you are intent on a sale of assets, or the sale of the equity in your business. Currently, the equity deal makes more sense, but that might change after Tuesday.

Either way, all profitable businesses will be equally affected, and the rising tide thing may save us from wild valuation changes. Expect though, that buyers will lean on you either way. Take their nonsense with a pinch of salt. Sit back. Take some advice. Don’t panic.

4. Once off tax on company reserves

Now there is a bombshell waiting to explode.

For a long time the government has been castigating companies about the piles of cash they are sitting on without investing it. There is a mountain of cash sitting doing nothing in many businesses. Government has appealed for this money to be invested. Business has shrugged and suggested that Government should perhaps make things a bit more business friendly (particularly around labour laws).

A once off tax on this enormous reserve would go very far in driving off the ratings agencies.

Effect on your business value

This is a game changer. It is also fool proof. Say 1% tax on all company reserves, which have already been taxed on corporate tax, but not on dividends tax. Perhaps business should be required to use it for investment or submit to a once off taxation. SARS already knows how much it can depend on because we have been submitting our financial statements to them for years.

There will be a lot of money looking for investment homes in small businesses. That will drive business value up sharply and quickly. It will also stimulate the economy like nothing else. This will have a knock on opportunity effect for other taxes to be collected. It will accelerate the capital gains tax collection from business sellers.

It might just be a golden opportunity for well prepared businesses to get out at above average values.

 

Other

You may notice that I have ignored all that talk about Government slowing down on its spending. That’s because we have heard it all before, and we all know it’s not likely to happen. Before Easter we will have some more scandal around one or other minister, MP or director general wasting money on cars, hotels, trips, houses, alcohol or pantypreneurs. Most of us know it will happen. Frankly it is small cheese in comparison, so let’s just concentrate on getting more money in.

 

*PS I am not privy to any ministerial discussions, and the blog written here is pure conjecture in as far as what may be decreed. There is a strong possibility that I have it all wrong. Wouldn’t it be fun if I have it all correct?

Get your taxes paid here

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The growing socio economic imperatives of South Africa in an environment of close to zero growth in the economy, means that without any windfalls such as even lower oil prices (currently at about $32 per barrel, and with less and less space to fall), or a huge rebound in the value of the Rand (unlikely while the ANC persists with Zuma), or some miracle; taxes will have to go up.

Big businesses take the view that taxes must be paid by their customers. It’s that simple. They need to give an expected return to their shareholders. Initially they will embark on much marketing noise about “absorbing the cost for the sake of the man in the street”, but eventually consumer prices will rise to give effect to the profits line. Joseph Stiglitz has a lot to say about this attitude, and it isn’t nice; but that’s another story.

Big businesses can indulge in this practice because their competitors all do the same thing, and because consumers expect inflation to happen, and therefore expect to see higher prices, given all the hot air in the media. There is simply no consumer push back. And how would they do that anyway?

Small businesses with a bit of oomph behind them, are also able to pass their tax costs onto their own customers. Business owners who have been around the block a few times, know that if they try to absorb the extra tax expense for their customers, they will eventually lose those customers when the business folds, anyway. They will cease to be tax payers themselves.

Businesses which have a competitive edge will be able to lead the way, and will have the edge in the profit race. Simply put, they can actually start to benefit from the tax increase ahead of their weaker competitors who are afraid of losing customers.

No prizes for guessing which sort of business is more valuable.

What is your business exposure to tax increases like?